Triple Bill:
MASANHU KONGONYA (weaving of the hatchets)

Artist
Gilbert Douglas

Nation
Shona/Man'anja/Zezuru ZIM

Price ($)
10 - 25

Premiere
Australia

Date
6 May Saturday 6.30pm
7 May Sunday 6.30pm
8 May Monday 6.30pm

Duration
70 mins

Venue
Meat Market
Blackwood Street, Melbourne

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6 May 8 May Australia/Melbourne MASANHU KONGONYA (weaving of the hatchets) http://yirramboi.net.au/events/masanhu-kongonya-weaving-of-the-hatchets/ Artist: Gilbert Douglas Nation: Shona/Man'anja/Zezuru ZIM Price ($): 10 - 25 Duration: 70 mins MASANHU KONGONYA (weaving of the hatchets) is part of a triple Bill, which includes LLAETH (milk) and Monster. Masanhu Kongonya (weaving of the hatchets) - an examination of the societal tendency to shift blame - was inspired by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 3, ‘Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person’. Originally created in Zimbabwe it explores the results of ongoing unrest, trauma and quiet desperation imprinted on those who live in politically unstable environments in Africa. It was created as a response to the Zimbabwe land reform (grab) in 2000, which left the country divided according to skin colour, tribe and political affiliation. Masanhu Kongonya (weaving of the hatchets) explores what happens when we don’t know how to respond to something unusual or beyond our understanding – the ‘other’? A world where the questions of race, religion, culture and cohabiting remain. Meat Market RMIT School of Art art.school@rmit.edu.au Book

MASANHU KONGONYA (weaving of the hatchets) is part of a triple Bill, which includes LLAETH (milk) and Monster.

Masanhu Kongonya (weaving of the hatchets) – an examination of the societal tendency to shift blame – was inspired by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 3, ‘Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person’.

Originally created in Zimbabwe it explores the results of ongoing unrest, trauma and quiet desperation imprinted on those who live in politically unstable environments in Africa. It was created as a response to the Zimbabwe land reform (grab) in 2000, which left the country divided according to skin colour, tribe and political affiliation.

Masanhu Kongonya (weaving of the hatchets) explores what happens when we don’t know how to respond to something unusual or beyond our understanding – the ‘other’? A world where the questions of race, religion, culture and cohabiting remain.

#dance #weelamngalut

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